Government Summons CBC President Over Bonus Issue Amid Job Cuts

Members of Parliament have called on CBC President Catherine Tait to testify before the House of Commons Heritage Committee regarding the public broadcaster’s recent announcement of a 10% workforce reduction and the possibility of bonuses for executives. 

The committee, which met on Thursday, is set to convene with Tait early next year, though the specific date has yet to be determined. Pointing out the obvious, committee members have agreed to report to the House that granting bonuses amid layoffs would be inappropriate.

CBC spokesperson Leon Mar acknowledged the committee’s motion, stating in an email that the public broadcaster looks forward to addressing the committee’s inquiries.

The Canadian Broadcasting Corp., a Crown corporation, recently unveiled plans to cut 600 jobs and leave 200 vacancies unfilled over the next year due to a $125-million shortfall. But during a recent appearance on “The National,” Tait refrained from ruling out executive bonuses for the year, stating that it’s too early to determine the outcome.

CBC has faced criticism for its bonus program, which distributed over $99 million in bonuses to employees between 2015 and 2022, with $16 million allocated last year alone. The program is described by CBC as a “short-term incentive plan” designed to enhance employee retention and motivation aligned with the organization’s strategic goals. 

CBC has also confirmed that existing compensation agreements are not currently under review.

Bloc Quebecois, during the question period, called on Heritage Minister Pascale St-Onge to fire Tait if she does not renounce the job cuts.


Information for this story was found via The Canadian Press, and the sources and companies mentioned. The author has no securities or affiliations related to the organizations discussed. Not a recommendation to buy or sell. Always do additional research and consult a professional before purchasing a security. The author holds no licenses.

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