Settlement FINALLY Reached: Canadian West Coast Dock Workers and Employers End Dispute

Dock workers on Canada’s west coast, represented by the International Longshore and Warehouse Canada Union (ILWU), and their employers, grouped under the British Columbia Maritime Employers Association (BCMEA), have finally reached a settlement agreement.

The resolution seeks to put an end to a lingering dispute and 13-day strike that had threatened to escalate disruptions at Canada’s busiest ports, including the Port of Vancouver and the Port of Prince Rupert— both crucial gateways for exporting natural resources and importing raw materials.

The conflict began months earlier, with the ILWU, representing approximately 7,500 dock workers, seeking to negotiate a new contract with BCMEA. Issues of contention included wage increases and the expansion of the union’s jurisdiction to regular maintenance work on terminals.

As the situation grew increasingly dire, federal Labour Minister Seamus O’Regan intervened, threatening to impose a new collective agreement or a final binding agreement but later directed the Canada Industrial Relations Board (CIRB) to help resolve the dispute. This intervention came on the heels of a rejected labor contract proposal that included a 19.2% compounded wage increase and increased retirement payouts for eligible retiring employees.

The new deal, reached with the CIRB’s assistance, remained undisclosed, but both ILWU and BCMEA have recommended its ratification. ILWU secretary treasurer Bob Dhaliwal acknowledged the complexity of the process and said that new ratification votes would be scheduled, but stopped short of providing further details of when that would happen.

Information for this briefing was found via Canadian Press and the sources mentioned. The author has no securities or affiliations related to this organization. Not a recommendation to buy or sell. Always do additional research and consult a professional before purchasing a security. The author holds no licenses.

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